Hearing Diagnosis Awareness

Hearing Diagnosis Awareness

Hearing Health Decisions

3 in 10 people over age 60 have hearing loss, while 1 in 6 baby boomers (ages 41-59), or 14.6% have a hearing problem. [1]

DID YOU KNOW?

Only 13% of physicians routinely screen for hearing loss during a physical
and hearing loss may not be as evident in a quiet medical office.[2]

NORMAL HEARING

The ear has three functional areas that help us hear. The outer ear collects sound waves that are processed by the middle and inner ear. The sounds trigger eardrum vibrations, which the middle ear’s three small bones amplify as they are en route to the inner ear. From there, vibrations pass through fluid of the inner ear’s cochlea where nerve cells have thousands of tiny hairs which convert sound vibrations into electrical signals that are transmitted to your brain.

CONDUCTIVE HEARING LOSS

Diagnostic Focus: Outer Ear and Middle Ear

Conductive hearing loss is the failure of sound mechanisms to effectively transmit from the outer to the middle ear. This condition may occur alone or be accompanied by sensorineural hearing loss. This may be taken care of medically or by surgical treatment options including minimally invasive bone conduction systems and cochlear implants.

SENSORINEURAL HEARING LOSS

Diagnostic Focus: Inner Ear and Brain Pathway

Sensorineural hearing loss is caused by damage to and dysfunction of the inner ear’s sensory cells or nerve pathways to the brain. This most common type of hearing loss typically cannot be medically or surgically corrected. Standard treatment options include proper fitting of digital hearing devices.

Mixed hearing loss refers to a combination of conductive and sensorineural dysfunction.

Hearing Diagnosis Awareness

Hearing Health Decisions

3 in 10 people over age 60 have hearing loss, while 1 in 6 baby boomers (ages 41-59), or 14.6% have a hearing problem. [1]

DID YOU KNOW?

Only 13% of physicians routinely screen for hearing loss during a physical
and hearing loss may not be as evident in a quiet medical office.[2]

NORMAL HEARING

The ear has three functional areas that help us hear. The outer ear collects sound waves that are processed by the middle and inner ear. The sounds trigger eardrum vibrations, which the middle ear’s three small bones amplify as they are en route to the inner ear. From there, vibrations pass through fluid of the inner ear’s cochlea where nerve cells have thousands of tiny hairs which convert sound vibrations into electrical signals that are transmitted to your brain.

CONDUCTIVE HEARING LOSS

Diagnostic Focus: Outer Ear and Middle Ear

Conductive hearing loss is the failure of sound mechanisms to effectively transmit from the outer to the middle ear. This condition may occur alone or be accompanied by sensorineural hearing loss. This may be taken care of medically or by surgical treatment options including minimally invasive bone conduction systems and cochlear implants.

SENSORINEURAL HEARING LOSS

Diagnostic Focus: Inner Ear and Brain Pathway

Sensorineural hearing loss is caused by damage to and dysfunction of the inner ear’s sensory cells or nerve pathways to the brain. This most common type of hearing loss typically cannot be medically or surgically corrected. Standard treatment options include proper fitting of digital hearing devices.

Mixed hearing loss refers to a combination of conductive and sensorineural dysfunction.

Help us to help you hear better. Please call to schedule a personal consultation.

[1][2] betterhearing.org/hearingpedia/prevalence-hearing-loss

To learn more, please visit: asha.org/public/hearing/disorders/types

Help us to help you hear better. Please call to schedule a personal consultation.

[1][2] betterhearing.org/hearingpedia/prevalence-hearing-loss

To learn more, please visit: asha.org/public/hearing/disorders/types

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